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A favorite poem……

To Daffodils

Fair Daffodils, we weep to see
You haste away so soon;
As yet the early-rising sun
Has not attain’d his noon.
Stay, stay,
Until the hasting day
Has run
But to the even-song;
And, having pray’d together, we
Will go with you along.

We have short time to stay, as you,
We have as short a spring;
As quick a growth to meet decay,
As you, or anything.
We die
As your hours do, and dry
Away,
Like to the summer’s rain;
Or as the pearls of morning’s dew,
Ne’er to be found again.

Robert Herrick (1591-1674)

my-little-time-machine:

Paul Gauguin playing the harmonium in Alphonse Mucha’s studio at rue de la Grande-Chaumière, Paris, 1893

A classic!

my-little-time-machine:

Paul Gauguin playing the harmonium in Alphonse Mucha’s studio at rue de la Grande-Chaumière, Paris, 1893

A classic!

(Source: chimneyfish)

british-history:

The first edition of Frankenstein; or, the Modern Prometheus was published in London on this day in British history, 1 January 1818. The author was Mary Shelley, a young lady of twenty years who had begun writing the novel when she was eighteen years old. Her inspirations came from a ghost story writing contest proposed by Lord Byron, and also from a dream that Shelley credited with giving her the rough idea for the now iconic Frankenstein story.

A great favorite of mine!

british-history:

The first edition of Frankenstein; or, the Modern Prometheus was published in London on this day in British history, 1 January 1818. The author was Mary Shelley, a young lady of twenty years who had begun writing the novel when she was eighteen years old. Her inspirations came from a ghost story writing contest proposed by Lord Byron, and also from a dream that Shelley credited with giving her the rough idea for the now iconic Frankenstein story.

A great favorite of mine!

“New Year coming on apace
What have you to give me?
Bring you scathe, or bring you grace,
Face me with an honest face;
You shall not deceive me:”

from “Old and New Year Ditties”, Christina Georgina Rossetti.

archiemcphee:

Here’s an awesome little piece of history:
Archaeologists in the Burnt City have discovered what appears to be an ancient prosthetic eye. What makes this discovery exceptionally awesome is the striking description of how the owner and her false eye would have appeared while she was still alive and blinking:

[The eye] has a hemispherical form and a diameter of just over 2.5 cm (1 inch). It consists of very light material, probably bitumen paste. The surface of the artificial eye is covered with a thin layer of gold, engraved with a central circle (representing the iris) and gold lines patterned like sun rays. The female remains found with the artificial eye was 1.82 m tall (6 feet), much taller than ordinary women of her time. On both sides of the eye are drilled tiny holes, through which a golden thread could hold the eyeball in place. Since microscopic research has shown that the eye socket showed clear imprints of the golden thread, the eyeball must have been worn during her lifetime. The woman’s skeleton has been dated to between 2900 and 2800 BCE. 

So she was an extraordinarily tall woman walking around wearing an engraved golden eye patterned with rays like a tiny sun. What an awesome sight that must have been.
[via TYWKIWDBI]


Amazing!

archiemcphee:

Here’s an awesome little piece of history:

Archaeologists in the Burnt City have discovered what appears to be an ancient prosthetic eye. What makes this discovery exceptionally awesome is the striking description of how the owner and her false eye would have appeared while she was still alive and blinking:

[The eye] has a hemispherical form and a diameter of just over 2.5 cm (1 inch). It consists of very light material, probably bitumen paste. The surface of the artificial eye is covered with a thin layer of gold, engraved with a central circle (representing the iris) and gold lines patterned like sun rays. The female remains found with the artificial eye was 1.82 m tall (6 feet), much taller than ordinary women of her time. On both sides of the eye are drilled tiny holes, through which a golden thread could hold the eyeball in place. Since microscopic research has shown that the eye socket showed clear imprints of the golden thread, the eyeball must have been worn during her lifetime. The woman’s skeleton has been dated to between 2900 and 2800 BCE. 

So she was an extraordinarily tall woman walking around wearing an engraved golden eye patterned with rays like a tiny sun. What an awesome sight that must have been.

[via TYWKIWDBI]

Amazing!

(via historybizarre)

"for every historian……is in truth a kind of phantom, speaking to the present with the voice of a bygone age."

from E.T.A. Hoffman’s, “Doge and Dogaressa”
translated by R.J. Hollingdale

Or, “drink responsibly, leave the show to the band”.

Or, “drink responsibly, leave the show to the band”.

(Source: colleenrants)

sallyseltmannmusic:

Needle In The Hay
Hey everyone,
I have finally finished my new album! The first song I wanted you to hear is this one, ‘Needle In The Hay’. I recorded and produced the album with my husband Darren Seltmann, and it feels good to finally be at the stage where I can start sharing it with you! My friend Isobel Knowles made this incredible animation for the song, and it’s taken from a work she exhibited in 2012 called Sugar Fountain. More coming soon!